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Why mortality from endometrial cancer may be higher in black women

Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic cancer, diagnosed in one in 37 U.S. women. But there are known racial disparities in outcomes, as the five-year mortality rate among black women with endometrial cancer is 90% higher than it is among white women. Only 53% of black women with the condition receive an early diagnosis. …

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Lack of insurance a major cause of delayed breast cancer treatment among minority women

Lack of insurance coverage is a major cause of delayed breast cancer screening and treatment among minority women, which could lead to a decrease in a patient’s chance of survival, according to a new study. Nearly half of the disparity in later-stage diagnosis between white (non-Hispanic) women and black, Hispanic and Asian/Pacific Islander women was …

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African-American women nearly twice as likely to die from endometrial cancer than other women

Black women have a 90 percent higher mortality rate from endometrial cancer than all other groups of women with this cancer. It’s four times more common than cervical cancer and twice as common as ovarian cancer, “but if endometrial cancer is caught early, it is almost always curable,” says Kemi Doll, a University of Washington …

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Immigrant Asian American women may be at higher risk for breast cancer

Asian American women who immigrated to the United States had a significantly higher risk for breast cancer than their U.S.-born counterparts, according to the results of a new study led by a researcher from the University of California, Riverside. Otherwise, breast cancer rates overall in the United States have stabilized since the 2000s. Brittany N. …

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African American women twice as likely as white women to be diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer

Cervical cancer used to be a major cause of death in women during their childbearing years.  But the development of the Pap smear in the 1950s and a vaccine in the 2000s against the virus that causes the cancer have greatly reduced the toll this cancer causes. But 4,000 American women still die each year …

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